Over 12 weeks, The Canadian Press published a series of multimedia packages to mark 150 years since Confederation. Crafted by a team of some of CP’s best writers, photographers and designers, these instalments focus on turning points in Canadian history and their greater impact on the country’s identity. The packages are fully responsive and work on all platforms, including desktop, tablet and mobile.

April 11 – Hockey

Beginning with Paul Henderson’s iconic goal in the 1972 Summit Series, a rapid-fire look at the history of Canada’s beloved game.

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Canada 150 hockey game. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

April 18 – Conscription: A linguistic divide

The decision to begin a draft split the country deeply on linguistic lines: almost every francophone MP rejected it while nearly every anglophone MP supported it.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

April 25 – Inventions & innovation

From the BlackBerry to the chocolate bar, from the Canadarm and the Caesar, products created by Canadians have changed the world.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

May 2 – Women’s rights

How a Toronto women's shelter had to fight for everything they gained and laid the groundwork for the problem of domestic violence to be brought to light.

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A staff member carries bedding in one of the suites at Toronto's Interval House, an emergency shelter for women in abusive situations, on Monday February 6, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

May 9 - Canada’s history with the oilsands

The oilsands industry is uniquely Canadian -- one that has fuelled both economic progress and environmental outrage.

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May 16 – Confederation

Many Maritimers will pointedly trace the region's economic decline to a specific day: July 1, 1867. That day was the beginning of the end of the "Golden Age" for three wealthy, self-governing East Coast trading powerhouses whose sailing ships ruled the seas.

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Library and Archives Canada; Copyright: Canada Post Corporation/THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

May 23 – On The Road

“The Wawa Four” set out in 1951 on a 17-day walk to the Soo. At their destination, they were feted as heroes and extracted promises to complete the Trans-Canada highway.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

May 30 - Canada as a hotbed for humour

A look at how “SCTV” helped Canada secured an international reputation as a fertile breeding ground for funnymen and women.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

June 6 - The Battle of the Atlantic

How the Royal Canadian Navy’s enormous expansion during the Second World War turned a tiny flotilla into a 400-ship juggernaut.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

June 13 – A bitter legacy

With the legacy of residential schools and modern-day marginalization, many indigenous people wonder if the Canada’s 150th birthday is worth celebrating at all.

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Artist Alex Janvier pictured at his gallery in Cold Lake First Nations 149B Alta, on Wednesday February 8, 2017. Alex Janvier is a pioneer of contemporary Canadian aboriginal art in Canada.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

June 20 – The charter

Sunday shopping. Same-sex marriage. Medical assistance in dying. No legal restrictions on abortion. Those are just some of the momentous changes Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has wrought since it was entrenched in the newly patriated Constitution on a rainy April day 35 years ago during a black-tie signing ceremony.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons

June 27 - Multiculturalism

Canada's identity has been shaped by its people, from its original Indigenous inhabitants, to its earliest settlers, to the immigrants who have arrived from all over the planet — now representing more than 250 ethnic origins, from Afghan to Zulu — to build a new life in Canada. They brought elements of their cultures with them, through their food, their dress, their prayers and language, contributing to the identity of Canada as it evolved into the diverse society it is today. It is a story that, by virtue of our history and geography, is uniquely Canadian. It is a story that allows the four children of Sen. Paul Yuzyk and his wife, Mary, to celebrate their Ukrainian heritage and yet be proudly, unquestionably Canadian. It was not always written that way.

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THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lucas Timmons